Resources available for women who want to be entrepreneurs

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

ABC 4 News invited the Chamber’s Women’s Business Center Director Ann Marie Thompson to do a feature on the resources that woman seeking to be entrepreneurs have available to them in Utah.

ABC 4 invited the WBC to join them because of their feature in the “Women-Owned: Businesses Carving A New American Business Landscape” report by the U.S. Chamber, which was released at the end of March.

Watch the interview above or click here to watch it on ABC 4 News.

WBC: Women forging America’s new entrepreneurial landscape

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Utah is ripe for building a business and doing business. However, the landscape of doing business is constantly evolving and at the forefront right now are women.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s third annual Center for Women in Business Summit on March 27 in Washington, D.C., celebrated the successes of business women around the country. More than ever, women are stepping forward in becoming CEOs, managers and even entrepreneurs.

In fact, the fourth annual American Express OPEN State of Women-Owned Businesses Report indicates that Utah alone has an estimated 73,000 women-owned firms employing more than 58,000 and doing $13 billion in sales. Since 1997, the national number of women-owned business has increased 68 percent and Utah has seen growth of 73.8 percent over that same period.

Talk about women making business happen.

The aforementioned summit marked the launch of a new report, titled, “Women-Owned: Businesses Carving a New American Business Landscape.”  This presents the Center for Women in Business’s latest research highlights the growing impact of women entrepreneurs and small business owners on the national economy. The report also says that Utah is one of the top states for self-employed women.

It opens:

The face of entrepreneurship is changing.

Over the last 15 years, women-owned firms have grown by one and a half times the rate of other small enterprises and now account for almost 30 percent of all businesses. Additionally, one in five firms with revenue of $1 million or more is woman-owned.

In the “Women-Owned” report, the Salt Lake Chamber’s Women’s Business Center (WBC) is highlighted as being “unlike many such centers, the WBC is operated as a nonprofit organization within the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, giving it access to a unique set of tools and resources to aid female entrepreneurs,” including the option of using chamber resources to enhance their offerings such as events, opportunities to connect with Chamber member business professionals, developing international business, consulting, training and mentoring.

“As one of the best places to do business in country, Utah’s smart and innovative women are making a difference in small business locally,” says Ann Marie Thompson, program director of the WBC. “Daily we assist women who are starting and growing businesses. We witness first-hand the exciting advancement of great products and services in the marketplace.”

To read the complete feature, see page 30 of the Women-Owned: Businesses Carving a New American Business Landscape.”

Furthermore, The Center for Women in Business examines the “1099 economy” and the women who have started their own micro-enterprises either out of choice or necessity. The research also provides powerful examples of systems and programs that encourage and support women’s business initiatives in communities around the United States.

Though this report is only a snapshot of what’s going on in our nation, women are making a huge impact in how business gets done, and are paving the way for more women to take to the helm in entrepreneurship.

The Center for Women in Business (CWB) promotes and empowers women business leaders to achieve their personal and professional goals by increasing opportunities for women to serve on corporate boards and in the C-suite; mentoring women in the early stages of their careers or re-entering the workforce; and building a network of women entrepreneurs to encourage peer-to-peer networking, education, and professional growth.

WHM Feature – Rebecca Chavez-Houck

Monday, March 24th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck. Read on!

*   *   *

What role do you play within your organization?
I am Assistant Minority Whip for the Democratic Caucus of the Utah House of Representatives. I have represented the constituents of House District 24 since 2008.

What boards do you serve on?
Envision Utah (Executive Committee, Board of Directors)
ACLU of Utah (Board of Directors)

I also serve on the advisory boards of HEAL Utah, Plan B Theatre Company and the Utah AIDS Foundation. Prior service includes serving on the governing boards of Intermountain Healthcare, YWCA, Planned Parenthood Action Council and Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, as well as the standing committee for the Episcopal Diocese of Utah.

In what other ways are you involved in the community?
I teach in the Master of Public Administration program at the U of U, serving as adjunct faculty since 2010.

One of my most rewarding experiences was hosting a weekly Latino public affairs radio program on KRCL 91FM, for 15 years, starting in 1989.

I am a current member of the Utah Women’s Forum and served as past president (2007).

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
I have garnered many rewarding professional experiences during my nearly 30 years of work in nonprofit administration and public affairs for the following organizations:

- Utah Public Employees Association
- Girl Scouts of Utah
- Utah Museum of Natural History
- Centro de la Familia de Utah

I’ve been enriched by the cumulative and unique learning opportunities offered by each of my professional and volunteer endeavors, including my activism within the Utah State Democratic Party (where I served on the state Executive Committee) and Salt Lake Democratic Party (where I served as 2nd Vice President). It’s difficult to identify a single experience, because my reward has been cumulative.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
Challenges continue to exist in the area of work-life balance for many women. I had the benefit of having very generous family members who provided support and assistance with child care when my children were young. Not every young family has this assistance readily at hand. There are hopeful changes on the horizon, where we see more fathers taking the lead in child-rearing and other family duties (i.e. more stay-at-home dads), but I don’t know whether this trend is as valued in Utah to the extent that it is in other metropolitan areas of the US.

Our Utah culture still often devalues the economic contributions of women in the workforce and as entrepreneurs. I am disappointed that women are still often overlooked for promotions because men are often seen as the main breadwinners in Utah families, when statistics prove otherwise.

The future economic vitality of Utah is contingent on the economic success of both women and men.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Surround yourself with personal and professional cheerleaders who believe in you and who support and take pride in your endeavors. Your life partner should be someone who is not self–centered, but instead someone who values the contributions of women in the workplace, home, and community, and exemplifies that value in his or her words, opinions, and actions. Observe how your potential life partner treats women in his life (mother, sisters, women friends, work colleagues).

Always be prepared to provide for yourself and your family: the best laid plans can be waylaid by tragic circumstances that are beyond your control. Being a good mother to one or two children is just as rewarding as being a mother to many. Live within your means. Always be open to learning from your experiences and grab opportunities that avail themselves to you.

Serendipity is an amazing thing–be willing to take calculated risks.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

WHM Feature – Pat Jones

Friday, March 21st, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Senator Pat Jones. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
I have two lives:
(1) State Senator (I have served in the Utah State Legislature for 14 years; this is my last year).
(2) I am President of Dan Jones & Associates, a consultant to the Cicero Group and a professional qualitative researcher (I listen to people for a living!).

What boards do you serve on?
I currently serve on the following boards: Salt Lake Chamber, United Way, St. Mark’s Hospital, Intermountain Healthcare Community Services Foundation, Hale Centre Theatre and This is the Place State Park.

In what other ways are you involved in the community?
I am often asked to speak to groups regarding the importance of community involvement, especially among women. I like to work with teens and young adults to (hopefully) inspire them to prepare themselves for college and for life, to give them hope that there are wonderful opportunities out there. And I love working with little children. Over the years, I have found myself championing for the underdog, for those who strive to climb out of difficult circumstances.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
For many years, I have worked on issues that affect all of us, including public and higher education funding, substance abuse prevention, issues that challenge our senior citizens, health maintenance and disease prevention, and financial literacy. I have sponsored several bills in my tenure in the legislature that deal with all of these issues. I am proud to say that this past session, I sponsored and passed landmark legislation that will improve financial literacy in our schools. Last year, I sponsored and passed critical legislation that will prevent melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. And, I have volunteered my time in trying to understand and find policy answers to the ever-growing problem of substance abuse, particularly abuse of pain killers. I have volunteered a tremendous amount of time on commissions and task forces related to public education and how to find sources of new revenue that end up in the classroom to sustain and support our great teachers in Utah. I sponsored legislation that created the Utah Commission on Aging, a powerful group that puts forth policy ideas to improve the lives of our senior citizens.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
I think the biggest challenge for women is that they don’t visualize the depth of their own potential. Utah has incredible women that are ambitious, intelligent and creative. Often, they don’t know where to get capital and support. But there are a number of resources available to them. Women just need to believe in themselves and take a chance.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Run for office, or at least help other women that are willing to do so. It is critical that women are at the table when policy decisions are made. The decisions made by political office holders directly affect each of our families and businesses. Women have unique insights and absolutely need to be part of the process; don’t let others make those critical decisions without your guidance and input. Be engaged. Be energized. Be interested.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

WHM Feature – Maria Farrington

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Maria Farrington. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
Chief Executive Officer of Discovery Gateway. The role I play is one where I set the direction and tone of the oldest children’s museum in Utah. I am the voice of imagination, discovery and connecting children with the tremendous world we all live in. I also work with a great creative team that helps me in through communication using innovation and technology.

What boards to you serve on?

-The Pete Suazo Business Center
-Utah Women’s Forum
-State of Utah: Office of Museum Services
-Association of Children’s museums: Program committee
-University of Utah: Tanner Center for Peace & Justice
-University of Utah: College of Consumer & Family Studies

In what other ways are you involved in the community?
Working with mentoring young minority women through the Women’s Resource Center is very important to me as a professional.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
I’d have to tell you I’ve had many and am very thankful for each of those times. One that is impressive is meeting with Barbara Bush and discussing how, as women, we could create avenues of opportunity to keep students in school and ultimately graduate from college. Another happened when we celebrated 35 years of operation as the first children’s museum in Utah. Knowing that I was leading an organization that had been functioning for 35 years meant so much to me. Finally, daily, I try to create and recognize a rewarding experience.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
There are not enough of us to bring the next generations along properly. Too many women are not getting a seat in the board room. The second challenge is the myth that a women can’t have a family and succeed. It can be done and as CEO’s and managers, and as women professionals, it’s up to us to create an strategies to make this a reality.

My recommendation is to recognize alternative work rules, such as remote employment, letting women choose to take two months instead of six months maternity leave if they have the support to succeed. Also, job sharing has shown to have impressive results. We must try alternatives that will allow more women to be competitive. Though interns are sometimes given work that is not thought out. If, as women professionals, we could create meaningful internships with the intern in mind, this would put a woman in a position that might catapult her into a higher level position.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
I’d have to give one that was given to me: listen and volunteer for a harder job than you have. Work diligently to succeed in that instance and show those around you that you will get the job done.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

WHM Feature – Jennifer Seelig

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Jennifer Seelig. Read on!

*   *   *

What role do you play in your organization?
As the Democratic Leader in the Utah House of Representatives, it is my responsibility to organize the talents of caucus members, including committee placements, legislative priorities, and to assist each member as they develop their legislative voice. I provide leadership to the caucus and communicate a singular message on important issues, assist in unifying the caucus, and coordinate efforts between the majority and minority caucuses.

What boards do you serve on?

· YWCA Public Policy Advisory Group
· SpyHop Advisory Board
· Junior League of SLC – Community Advisor
· Utah Pride Center – Board of Directors
· Women in Government Foundation – Board of Directors
· State Legislative Leaders – Board of Directors
· WAND – Board of Directors

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
In 2013, I was honored to be the legislator who, after nearly a decade, was able to pass the Dating Violence Protection Act. I was not the first legislator to propose such protections, but I was the one who carried the baton across the finish line after years of hard work from legislators and advocates across the state. This was a success to me not because of my name on the legislation, but because of amazing empowerment the stakeholders and I were able to watch blossom in the hearts and minds of people who fell victim to this kind of abuse. I will never forget those who came before and worked hard with me, who dedicated their time and energy to such a worthy cause.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today?
Women absolutely have to fight for balance between their professional and personal lives. That is not a fight everyone has to face. As our world grows and changes, many businesses will begin adopting policies that are no longer divisive, but instead support all types of workers and their families through time flexibility and other creative alternatives.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Never give up.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

Also in honor of this month, the WBC‘s Business Women’s Forum is hosting a breakfast on Tuesday, March 18, presented by Girl Scouts of Utah at Hotel Monaco. You can find out more and register here

WHM Feature – Sophia DiCaro

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Sophia DiCaro. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

What boards do you serve on?
Multicultural Commission, co-chair of the Economic Development Subcommittee.

In what other ways are you involved in the community?
I am currently running for office as the Republican candidate for House District 31 and look forward to supporting the business community and education. My husband and I also enjoy being heavily involved in supporting our children’s school.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
I feel grateful to have the opportunity to work with one of the strongest economic development teams in the nation. It is rewarding for me to be surrounded by a highly professional and passionate team whom I learn from every day. Knowing that we, as a team, are bringing in high quality jobs that make a difference for families in our state is very rewarding.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
Getting women to embrace the fact that they are a worthy and positive contribution to the business community can sometimes be perceived as a challenge. We need more women to get engaged in business, government and community activities. This will only lift our society as a whole and set the tone for generations to come. We should continue to promote the opportunities that are available to encourage not only women, but people of all backgrounds to get involved in their communities and be successful in their business pursuits.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
If you have a goal, you should work toward it each and every day. Always remember that the only limitation you have is yourself. So if you have a dream, a goal or something you want to check off your bucket list, go for it. Life is short, and it shouldn’t be taken for granted.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

Also in honor of this month, the WBC‘s Business Women’s Forum is hosting a breakfast on Tuesday, March 18, presented by Girl Scouts of Utah at Hotel Monaco. You can find out more and register here

WHM Feature – Genevieve Atwood, PhD

Monday, March 17th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today we’re featuring Genevieve Atwood, PhD. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
CEO (Chief Education Officer) of Earth Science Education. We’re a small non-profit whose mission is to encourage children and their teachers to go outside and appreciate the earth science that surrounds them. We teach outside, such as, in cemeteries (great rocks) and dry creek beds (erosion / deposition). We create web-based and audio materials for teachers who want to teach literacy using stories about Utah’s amazingly diverse and visible geologic features. I lead the organization and enlist volunteers to share the joy factor of outdoor science.

What boards do you serve on?
Right now I serve on the boards of the Provo River Water Users Association and the Greater Avenues Community Council.

In what other ways are you involved in the community?
I teach Geography of Utah, adjunct, at the University of Utah, a course required for some teaching degrees.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
My most rewarding professional experiences are to share information about how Earth works and enable Utah to become richer, safer and better understood geologically. I believe that, secretly, everyone wants to be an Earth scientist, a good steward of Earth. Our great hope is education.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
As for challenges for women in business and in politics (that I understand better), the big challenges are character, courage and commitment. It’s easy to say: Do what is right let the consequences follow. But knowing what is right can be a challenge in our strange world of smushed boundaries. The consequences can be daunting. I have no novel revelations toward success. It helps to have multiple, independent, nets be they financial, family, colleagues and preparation.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Go outside and admire the beauty, power and sense of place of our Salt Lake Valley, the Wasatch and the Oquirrhs. Breathe deeply and forge ahead.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

Also in honor of this month, the WBC‘s Business Women’s Forum is hosting a breakfast on Tuesday, March 18, presented by Girl Scouts of Utah at Hotel Monaco. You can find out more and register here

WHM Feature – Nicole Kendrick

Friday, March 14th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today, we’re featuring Nicole Kendrick. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
I am an Account Manager with TEKsystems, the national largest IT staffing and services firm. My role is primarily business development and customer relationship management. Secondary to that includes mentor and training recruiters as well as helping my director with leadership and management. I am responsible for our local sales/leadership training program, which is a vehicle for emerging leaders within the office. I am also responsible for our employee resource group made up of 10 women. It is my role to make sure these women are given every opportunity to advance their career within the company, become civil leaders and build a strong foundation for future female employees.

In what ways are you involved in the community?
I am an active member of the Junior League of Salt Lake City, as well as the vice-chair of the Women’s Business Forum through the Chamber and a member of the Women’s Leadership Council with United Way.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
I am passionate about career growth and opportunity for young leaders within my office and community. The most rewarding part of my job is helping our team meet their personal and professional goals through guidance, motivation and determination.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
I believe our biggest challenging as women in the workforce is making our voice heard. I’ve had the opportunity to meet/work with some incredible women that are innovative, passionate and forward-facing in their roles. These women can do some amazing things if they have the confidence to make their voice heard. My recommendation is to speak up and make your ideas reality.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Don’t let anyone tell you what you can and can’t do. You determine your own success by your attitude, work ethic and perseverance. I’ve been very fortune to have a mentor that guided me early on in my career with TEKsystems that told me to never stop learning and pushing yourself.

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

Also in honor of this month, the WBC‘s Business Women’s Forum is hosting a breakfast on Tuesday, March 18, presented by Girl Scouts of Utah at Hotel Monaco. You can find out more and register here.

WHM Feature – Debra Hoyt

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

This post is part of a series of blogs that feature prominent businesswomen in Utah to celebrate Women’s History Month. 

Today, we’re featuring Debra Hoyt. Read on!

*   *   *

What is your title and what role do you play within your organization?
I’m director of Corporate Giving and Foundations as well as coordinator for Government Relations for Questar Corporation. I manage our corporate giving program along with our three foundations (education, arts and Native American). In addition to that, I also oversee the company’s political grass-roots program and the Questar Employee Political Action Committee, among other things.

What boards do you serve on?
I serve on the American Cancer Society Executive Committee Board and the Women’s Business Center Board through the Salt Lake Chamber.

In what other ways are you involved in the community?

- Outgoing chair for Utah Philanthropy Day and currently serve on committee for 2014’s event
- Outgoing chair for the Chamber’s Women & Business Conference/Athena Luncheon and currently serve on committee for 2014’s event
- Member of Salt Lake Rotary and serve on Welcoming Committee and am past chair of the committee
- Member and past chair of the Donor’s Forum
- Member of United Way’s Leadership Women’s Council as well as their Leadership Circle
- Member of Utah Nonprofits Association and support annual conference
- Member of Utah Society of Fund Raisers
- Currently serve on Nonprofit Excellence Award steering committee for Utah Nonprofits Association and have served on other committees for UNA
- Have been asked many times to be on various panels for classes relating to different Master’s programs at the University of Utah and Westminster College

I also help several nonprofits in various ways throughout the year and this can change from year to year, but has involved serving on: various committees, catalyst team for capital campaign, panels and acting as a resource for events.

Tell us about your most rewarding professional experience.
It’s difficult to pick just one because of what I have the opportunity to do. I’m fortunate to represent Questar Corporation in the community, which is an honor. Our company believes strongly in giving back and so I would say that my “continuous” rewarding experience is working with the many nonprofits and colleges and universities that I have the good fortune to interact with every day. There are so many amazing, courageous and determined people in our community doing wonderful things to help those in need and for me, just to be able to be a small part of those efforts, is an ongoing rewarding experience.

What do you see as the biggest challenge women face in business today? What is your recommendation to resolve that issue?
The biggest challenge I see is women believing that they have a voice at the table. We work in a male-dominated world and sometimes it’s a challenge to speak up, to voice our opinion and ideas and feel you will be taken seriously. But women need to move beyond those thoughts and realize what we bring to any situation is the right thing at the right moment. We often overthink about what happened previously and worry too much about what is going to happen in the future. You can’t change the past or determine the future and we women tend to expend a lot of energy trying to do both. My recommendation is to always show up prepared and live in the moment, learn to appreciate the here and now and let the other stuff take care of itself.

What pearl of wisdom would you share with young female professionals?
Two things, one of which I just referred to in my last comments, and those are:

- Be prepared—always
- Be yourself—always

Those are pearls of wisdom in my world that I’ve received from both women and men who I’d admire, and they work!

*   *   *

The United States has celebrated National Women’s History Month, highlighting the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society, since 1911.

The National Women’s History Project has dubbed the theme for this year, “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment,” which honors the extraordinary accomplishments, determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come.

Also in honor of this month, the WBC‘s Business Women’s Forum is hosting a breakfast on Tuesday, March 18, presented by Girl Scouts of Utah at Hotel Monaco. You can find out more and register here