Stay Safe to Stay Open2020-05-20T15:44:54-07:00

Initially Utah put in place a “stay safe, stay home” directive to navigate us through the urgent phase of the coronavirus pandemic. We are now into stabilization, with businesses and consumers needing guidance to follow as we re-engage economically.

The new theme, Stay Safe to Stay Open, speaks to both sides of the economic relationship. In order for our economy to reactivate and recover, both businesses and consumers must work together through safe practices. Staying safe and protecting the high-risk is something we can control.

In fact, as government officials locally and nationally talk about data-driven decisions, we can drive the data through our actions. Individual efforts to follow guidance and stick to the Utah Leads Together plan will move the economic and health numbers in our collective favor.

As we each practice common sense and good hygiene we will build a sustainable roadmap to the recovery phase in Utah Leads Together. This is how we can Stay Safe to Stay Open!

Connect with the Salt Lake Chamber on Twitter and follow #StaySafeStayOpen for the latest information.

Business

Employers exercise extreme caution, with employees working remotely, evaluating workforce concerns, and enacting strategies to minimize economic impact. Businesses that necessitate on-site work should monitor workforce for symptoms and well-being.

  • Employers take extreme precautions
  • Provide accommodations to high-risk employees
  • Employees and volunteers operate remotely, unless not possible
  • Symptom* checking in business interactions
  • Face coverings worn in settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain; ensure that face coverings are available
  • Make every possible effort to enable working from home as a first option; where not possible, workplaces comply with distancing and hygiene guidelines
  • Minimize face-to-face interactions, including with customers (e.g. utilize drive-thru, install partitions)
  • Where distancing and hygiene guidelines cannot be followed in full, businesses should consider whether that activity needs to continue for the business to operate
  • Eliminate unnecessary travel and cancel or postpone in-person meetings, conferences, workshops, and training sessions
  • Require employees to self-quarantine when returning from high-risk areas
  • Employers evaluate workforce strategy and concerns and enact strategies to minimize economic impact
  • Employers must not allow any individuals under isolation or quarantine to come to work at any time unless authorized by LHD

* Symptoms include fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or above, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, sudden change in taste or smell, muscle aches or pains

For specific industry recommendations visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Employers encourage flexible working arrangements (rotating shifts, remote work, etc.). Comply with distancing guidelines. Increased cleaning regimen of high-touch areas. Monitor employees for symptoms and well-being.

  • All businesses open
  • Employers take reasonable precautions
  • Provide accommodations to high-risk employees; minimize face-to-face contact, assign tasks that allow these individuals to maintain a 6-foot distance from other employees or customers, implement flexible work hours or staggered shifts, allow high-risk individuals to work remotely
  • Symptom* checking in business interactions
  • Face coverings worn in settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain; ensure that face coverings are available
  • Encourage remote work when possible; employers exercise discretion with returning to onsite work
  • Workplaces comply with distancing and hygiene guidelines
  • Limit unnecessary travel
  • Require employees to self-quarantine when returning from high-risk areas
  • Employers evaluate workforce strategy and concerns and enact strategies to minimize economic impact
  • Employers must not allow any individuals under isolation or quarantine to come to work at any time unless authorized by LHD

* Symptoms include fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or above, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, sudden change in taste or smell, muscle aches or pains

For industry specific guidelines visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Best Practices for Employers

  • Those who are, or work with, high-risk populations, should undergo daily screening/symptom monitoring, and be tested if they begin to experience COVID-19 symptoms. High-risk populations should take extra precautions to avoid close contact with multiple people
  • Use online conferencing, email, or telephone in place of in-person meetings, even when people are in the same building
  • Employees and customers should not congregate in groups; if your business involves a waiting area, customers should wait outside or in their cars
  • Encourage contactless pay options if possible; otherwise immediately disinfect transaction equipment
  • Make regular announcements to remind employees and customers to follow distancing guidelines. Use floor markings to mark appropriate physical distance where appropriate
  • Encourage digital files rather than paper formats (e.g. documentation, invoices, inspections, forms, agendas)
  • Consider what reserve supplies may be necessary to obtain (e.g., cleaning supplies, gloves or other protective equipment)
  • Consider the possibility of interruptions to water or power that might force closure
  • Establish and maintain open dialogue with local communities, including key vendors and suppliers, exploring contingencies and sharing appropriate decisions about foodservice, transportation, and other services
  • Identify a workplace coordinator who will be responsible for COVID-19 issues and their impact in the workplace
  • If relevant, update emergency communication plan with key contacts and backups, chain of communications, and processes for tracking and communicating; share the response plan with employees and communicate expectations
  • Ensure every employee’s contact information and emergency contact details are up to date; ensure a plan is in place to reach employees quickly
  • Educate workforce about the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic, what the business is doing, and what they should do to protect themselves and their families
  • Prepare for absenteeism—not only sick employees will stay home; others may need to care for the sick or children if schools close; those employees should notify their supervisors
  • Provide signage at each public entrance to inform all employees and customers that they should:
    • Avoid entering if they have a fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or above, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, muscle aches and pains, sudden changes in smell or taste, or feel generally unwell
    • Maintain a minimum 6-foot distance
    • Sneeze/cough into cloth, tissue, elbow or sleeve (not hands)
    • Avoid hand shaking or unnecessary physical contact
    • Wash hands often, and for at least 20 seconds
    • Wear face coverings

Cleaning & Hygiene Guidelines for Employers

  • Promote etiquette for coughing, sneezing, and handwashing; avoid touching face, especially eyes, nose, and mouth; place posters that encourage hand and respiratory hygiene
  • Face coverings should be worn by employees and patrons, especially when difficult or impossible to maintain 6-foot distance
  • Ensure adequate air circulation and post tips on how to stop the spread of germs
  • When possible, discourage sharing of work tools and equipment
  • Make a list of high-touch surfaces requiring routine disinfecting and perform routine environmental cleaning (e.g., elevator buttons, workstations, countertops, handrails, doorknobs, breakrooms, bathrooms, common areas), either twice a day or after each use. Keep a logbook of cleaning regimen. Those cleaning should:
    • Wear gloves
    • Prior to disinfecting, clean surfaces with soap and water if soiled
    • Use EPA-approved disinfectant, industrial cleaner, diluted bleach, or alcohol solutions
  • Provide disposable disinfecting wipes for employee use on high-touch surfaces; provide no-touch trash bins
  • Laundry: wear gloves, use warmest appropriate water setting, dry items completely, do not shake dirty laundry, launder items that have come in contact with COVID-19 separately
  • Make hand sanitizer, soap and water, or effective disinfectant readily available. Provide pop-up handwashing stations or facilities where necessary (e.g. open houses, construction sites)
  • Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) should not be shared and should be disposed of properly
  • After using gloves, employees should wash their hands

Employers Monitoring Symptoms*

  • Employees who are sick or who appear to have COVID-19 symptoms should be separated from other employees/customers immediately and sent home; immediately clean and disinfect areas the sick employee visited
  • Train managers/leadership to spot symptoms of COVID-19 and to be clear on relevant protocols
  • Monitor employee symptoms, especially fever (100.4 degrees Fahrenheit/38 degrees Celsius, or above). If employees take simple medications such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin, they should take temperature beforehand
  • Do not allow employees to come to work if they feel sick; create or maintain non-punitive leave policies so employees do not feel pressured to come to work if they are sick. Remind employees to report any illness to a manager, especially if sick with fever, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, muscle aches and pains, sudden changes in smell or taste
  • If an employee is confirmed COVID-19 positive, employers should inform close contact employees while maintaining confidentiality; close contact employees should self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days

*Symptoms include fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or above, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, sudden change in taste or smell, muscle aches or pains

For more information, visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Employees and consumers should wear masks while engaged with one another to maintain a safe environment. Wearing a mask while engaging in public commerce not only protects you, but others and shows why Utahns are good neighbors. 

  • Face coverings (e.g. mask, scarf, gaiter, bandana) worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain
  • Change or launder cloth face coverings routinely
  • Individuals should stay 6 feet away from others even when wearing a face covering
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under the age of 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance
  • Those businesses needing additional PPE can find a list of Utah Vendors to source locally to avoid potential supply chain disruption

For more information, visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Utahns are working to slow the spread of COVID-19. We can work together to protect our family members, friends, health workers, and our communities. The Healthy Together App helps you assess your symptoms, and the nearest testing center, view test results, and learn what to do after you’ve been tested for COVID-19.

Learn more about the Healthy Together App on coronavirus.utah.gov.

Consumer

  • General public take extreme precautions
  • Face coverings worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain
  • Follow strict hygiene standards, including:
    • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
    • Use hand sanitizer frequently
    • Avoid touching your face
    • Cover coughs or sneezes (e.g. into a tissue, sleeve, or elbow; not hands)
    • Regularly clean high-touch surfaces (e.g. door handles, counters, light switches, remote controls, restroom surfaces)
    • Follow any other standards promulgated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Utah Department of Health, and local health department
  • Do not shake hands
  • In-person interactions in decreased group sizes that enable all social distancing guidelines to be maintained; social interactions in groups of 20 or fewer
  • Increase virtual interactions
  • Leave home infrequently, stay 6 feet away from others when outside the home
  • Regularly disinfect high-touch areas (e.g. door handles, buttons/switches, countertops, handrails, shopping carts, check-out counters, restroom surfaces)
  • Give sick family members their own room if possible and keep the door closed
  • Have only one family member care for the sick individual
  • Schools closed

For specific recommendations visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

  • General public and employers take reasonable precautions
  • Face coverings worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain
  • Follow strict hygiene standards, including:
    • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
    • Use hand sanitizer frequently
    • Avoid touching your face
    • Cover coughs or sneezes (e.g. into a tissue, sleeve, or elbow; not hands)
    • Regularly clean high-touch surfaces (e.g. door handles, counters, light switches, remote controls, restroom surfaces)
    • Follow any other standards promulgated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Utah Department of Health, and local health department
  • Do not shake hands
  • In-person interactions in decreased group sizes that enable all social distancing guidelines to be maintained; social interactions in groups 50 or fewer
  • Maintain social distancing when in public settings
  • Regularly disinfect high-touch areas (e.g. door handles, buttons/switches, countertops, handrails, shopping carts, check-out counters, restroom surfaces)
  • Give sick family members their own room if possible and keep the door closed
  • Have only one family member care for the sick individual
  • Schools refer to K-12 guidelines on coronavirus.utah.gov.

For specific guidelines visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Consumers should wear masks while engaged with one another to maintain a safe environment. Wearing a mask while engaging in public commerce not only protects you, but others and shows why Utahns are good neighbors. 

  • Face coverings (e.g. mask, scarf, gaiter, bandana) worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain
  • Change or launder cloth face coverings routinely
  • Individuals should stay 6 feet away from others even when wearing a face covering
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under the age of 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance
  • While retail stores may not have adequate masks in supply, the Governor created an initiative “A Mask For Every Utahn” to assist in this important protective equipment. Simply request a mask for yourself or your family and they will be shipped to you free of charge

For more information, visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Utahns are working to slow the spread of COVID-19. We can work together to protect our family members, friends, health workers, and our communities. The Healthy Together App helps you assess your symptoms, and the nearest testing center, view test results, and learn what to do after you’ve been tested for COVID-19.

Learn more about the Healthy Together App on coronavirus.utah.gov.

High-risk individuals are defined as people 65 years and older, people who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility, people of all ages with underlying medical conditions, including lung disease or moderate to severe asthma, people who have serious heart conditions, people who are immunocompromised (many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications), people with severe obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis, or liver disease.

  • Face coverings worn at all times in public setting
  • Limit travel to only essential travel; if telework is not possible, limit travel to work-related travel only
  • Limit visiting friends or family without urgent need
  • Limit physical interactions with other high-risk individuals, except for members of your household or residence
  • Limit attending gatherings of any number of people outside your household or residence
  • Do not visit hospitals, nursing homes, or other residential care facilities

Essential travel means to: safely relocate by an individual whose home or residence is unsafe, including individuals who have suffered or are at risk of domestic violence, or for whom the safety, sanitation or essential operations of the home or residence cannot be maintained; care for a family member or friend in the same household or another household, including transporting family members or friends; transport a child according to existing parenting time schedules or other visitation schedules pertaining to a child in need of protective services; care for pets, including travel to a veterinarian; seek emergency services; obtain medications and medical services; donate blood; obtain food, including delivery or carry-out services, beverages (alcoholic and non-alcoholic), and other grocery items, gasoline, supplies required to work from home, and products needed to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of homes and residences, businesses, and personally owned vehicles, including automobiles and bicycles; perform work if you cannot telework; transport/deliver essential goods; engage in recreational and outdoor activities; laundromats and dry cleaners; return to a home or place of residence.

For more information, visit coronavirus.utah.gov.

Additional resources can be found at coronavirus.utah.gov.